Teaching Students How to

Write On-Demand

 

 

A Unit of Study for High School Teachers

 

 

 

Bullitt County Public Schools

Fall 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Angela Moore

District Curriculum Coach
TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Introduction

 

On-Demand Writing Assessment Update

 

Lesson 1          On-Demand Writing Assessment and the Kentucky Scoring Rubric

Lesson 2          Characteristics of the Genres of On-Demand Writing

Lesson 3          Idea Development Strategies

Lesson 4          Persuasive Techniques

Lesson 5          Prompt Analysis

Lesson 6          Flashdrafting

Lesson 7          Using a Graphic Organizer

Lesson 8          Responding to a Prompt          

Lesson 9          Revision Techniques

Lesson 10        Self-Assessment Strategies

           

Appendix         Annotated Released Test Items, On-Demand Writing Prompts, Template for

On-Demand Writing Prompts


INTRODUCTION

 

On-demand writing assesses a student’s ability to communicate effectively through the written word in a timed, testing environment.*  High school students at all grade levels should practice all forms of on-demand writing (article, editorial, letter, and speech).  This unit is designed to introduce or review writing strategies for students to use in on-demand writing.  It is not a comprehensive study of on-demand writing techniques; teachers should use it as one component of their instruction for on-demand writing.

 

High school English departments should carefully analyze their school’s needs for on-demand writing practice.  Students should learn writing strategies that focus on strengthening content (purpose, audience, idea development and support), structure (organization, transitional elements, sentence structure), and conventions (language and correctness) in their writing.  Teachers can use the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric (see Lesson 1) as a resource for ideas for instructional focus.  The Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric is used to assess both on-demand writing and portfolio writing.

 

Ninth, tenth, and eleventh graders are working toward the KCCT assessment in on-demand writing.  By the twelfth grade year, all students should be prepared to respond successfully to a writing prompt on the KCCT assessment. 

 

Please use your professional judgment to adapt the lessons in this unit to your own students’ needs and your teaching style.  The length of each lesson will vary based on your school’s schedule.  Feel free to supplement the lessons with your own lessons and/or extensions/accommodations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* On-demand writing is different from open-response writing.  On-demand writing assesses a student’s writing skills and abilities; open-response writing measures a student’s content knowledge, not writing skills and abilities.


ON-DEMAND ASSESSMENT - CLARIFICATION

Lee Ann Hager, High School Writing Consultant, KDE

Excerpt from the September 12, 2006 Cluster Leader Electronic Message

 

In 2007-2008, the part of the writing index that is on demand (50%) will be calculated with each of these prompts (direct and passage-based) counting 1/2 of the 50%.

 

Passage-based prompts

 

Like the name indicates the passage-based prompts will ask students to draw, in part, on a passage they are provided for their response.  This is a traditional type of activity in most language arts classes.  Students will be given a short (1/2-3/4 page) non-fiction passage and a writing task.  The writing task will be set up like the direct prompt except that it will ask students to draw on information from the passage.  This prompt isn’t intended to be a reading test.  The passage simply provides students equal information on which to draw for their response.

 

Preparing for Passage-based prompts


To prepare students for what they will see if they receive a passage-based prompt as the second prompt, have them practice writing in response to tasks that require the student to use information from short passages.  You might find short passages in the newspaper or in magazines.  Then, direct students to read the passage and draw on the information for the task you provide.  This task is similar to the direct prompt in that it will provide the audience, purpose, and a choice of two logical forms.

 

Example:

 

Students have been presented with an editorial that argues for a smoking ban in public places.  It gives facts, background, statistics, etc.  The students will read the editorial and then complete the task.  They should be able to draw on the information in the passage.  The task might read something like this:          

 

Based on what you read in the passage about the smoking ban in public places, take a stand on the issue and write an editorial or an article to persuade your town council to agree with your point of view.

 

Make certain your prompts are constructed correctly in that you ask students to narrate for a purpose, inform or persuade to a logical audience in one of the OD forms:  letter, article, speech, editorial.

                                               


 

UNIT: On-Demand Writing

 

TOPIC:  On-Demand Assessment and the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric

 

LESSON 1 OBJECTIVE:  Students will understand the concept of on-demand writing and the organization and language of the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric.

 

CORE CONTENT FOR ASSESSMENT 4.1: 

Writing Content:  WR-HS-1.1.3 – Purpose/Audience; WR-HS- 1.2.3 - Idea Development

Writing Structure: WR-HS-2.3.3 – Organization; WR-HS-2.4.3 – Sentence Structure

Writing Conventions: WR-HS-3.5.0 – Language; WR-HS- 3.6.0 – Correctness

 

VOCABULARY:

 

On-Demand Writing

Form

Purpose

Audience

Situation

Task

Content

Structure

Conventions

Narrate

Persuade

Inform

 

RESOURCES AND MATERIALS:

Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric (copies for students and a transparency)

Highlighters

 

TEACHING STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES:

 

  • Writer’s Notebook

Ask students to write for a short time period on any associations that they can make with the term “on-demand” in their real life (e.g., On-Demand TV).  What does on-demand mean to them?

 

·        Share

Ask students to connect what they have written to the concept of on-demand writing.  Invite students to share their ideas with the group as you jot them down on the board.

 

·        Describe on-demand writing for the students.  Explain that it is a timed writing test that measures their writing skills and abilities.  Discuss the forms of on-demand writing: article, editorial, letter, and speech.  Be sure to emphasize that on-demand writing prompts always present a situation and a writing task.  It might be a good idea to share a sample released prompt with students at this time so they see what you are discussing.  The purpose, audience, and form will be identified within that situation and writing task.  The purpose of on-demand writing will be to narrate for a purpose, inform, or persuade.  The audience will be an authentic, real-world audience (e.g., the Board of Education, the SBDM Council, newspaper readers, etc.).  The form will be an article, an editorial, a letter, or a speech.

 

·        Distribute the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric.  Explain that it is used to score responses to on-demand writing prompts.  Spend time looking at the document with the students.  Identify the cells, subdomains, and indicators.  Use the annotated document included with this lesson to guide your discussion.

 

·        Ask students to highlight the important language of the document in the 4 column.  Guide students to look for the underlined words in the annotated rubric included in this lesson (e.g., focused, insightful, purpose, audience, idea development, transitions, etc.).

 

·        Annotate the rubric together as a class.

 

·        Divide the class into groups of three students.  Assign each group a subdomain of the rubric (Content, Structure, Conventions).  Groups should use the annotated rubric they completed earlier to create signs for a class Word Wall.  Ask students to focus on the words they highlighted from the 4 column.  Students should use a dictionary to define the terms they select.  Post the best ones on the class Word Wall to refer to during instruction.

 

·        Writer’s Notebook

Students write about their new knowledge of the term on-demand.  What new meaning does this term have for them after this lesson?  Ask students to jot down any new words they learned in today’s lesson.

 

 

 ASSESSING THE LEARNING:

Collect annotated rubrics and observe groups.


UNIT: On-Demand Writing

 

TOPIC: Characteristics of the Genres (Forms) of On-Demand Writing

 

LESSON 2 OBJECTIVE:  Students will understand each of the four forms of on-demand writing and their characteristics.

 

CORE CONTENT FOR ASSESSMENT 4.1: 

Writing Content:  WR-HS-1.1.3 – Purpose/Audience; WR-HS- 1.2.3 - Idea Development

 

VOCABULARY:

 

Characteristics

Genre

Letter

Feature Article

Editorial

Speech

 

RESOURCES AND MATERIALS:

 

Copies of the Blueprints for On-Demand Writing

Copies of sample letter, article, editorials, speech

 

TEACHING STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES:

 

·  Distribute the On-Demand Writing Blueprints for Article, Editorial, Letter, and Speech. 

* Teachers might want to divide this lesson into several mini-lessons that focus on each form individually over the course of four class meetings.

 

·  Writer’s Notebook

Students respond to the following question in their notebooks:  What characteristics of the different forms do you already know?  Which form are you most comfortable writing?  Which characteristics were unfamiliar to you?

 

·  Paired Reading and Think Alouds[1]

A Think-Aloud is a conversation between two persons throughout a new text.

They read it aloud together, stopping at any point when either partner has a thought to

articulate. As a student explains his thoughts while reading, the teacher can listen

carefully to understand how that student is making sense of the text. “Thinking aloud”

(Feathers, Infotext Reading and Learning, 1993) also helps the student recognize and

internalize his own reading processes (metacognition). Teachers must model the

“thinking aloud” process for most students before they can do it alone.

 

· You will select a student in advance to model a Think-Aloud for the class; explain to him or her what a Think-Aloud is and consider practicing with the checklist.

 

· You will be modeling many of these thinking strategies for your class:

-engaging in informal conversation about thinking

-making connections to your own prior knowledge and experiences as related to

the advertisement

-making connections with text (text-self, text-text, text-world)

-demonstrating thinking/understanding before, during, and after reading

-verbalizing author’s purpose/intent

--making predictions before reading based on graphic information

-checking accuracy of predictions during and after reading

-responding to text with evaluative language (“I think...” or “I

dis/agree...”)

-evaluating validity or truth

-identifying persuasive tone and language in the text

-identifying persuasive techniques and/or propaganda

-“talking through” problems or unknown words in the text

 

· Explain to the class that you and the student will read the editorial, “Viking Pride Battle for Lost Integrity,” aloud and stop at points to help each other figure out what the writing means. You and the student will take turns reading aloud, perhaps a paragraph or section at a time.

You will stop to voice any and all thoughts that come to you, such as unfamiliar

words, questions, predictions, confirmations, disconfirmations, responses/reactions,

confusions, needs for clarification, connections to other texts or situations.  You will also stop to point out characteristics of the genre from the Blueprint as you read.

 

· Ask the student if s/he wants to read first or wants you to begin. Does s/he want to go

one paragraph at a time? Remember to interrupt the reading with any and all

thoughts. S/he will be inclined to keep reading. Let him or her see you using your checklist.

 

· The rest of the class will read the editorial silently as you and the student model

the think-aloud. They will use the checklist to note their own responses.

 

· Ask class to write about the demonstration in Writer’s Notebooks. They should talk

about their own thinking as they were reading and listening. Ask a few students to

share their comments. Remember, it may be their first exposure to the Think-Aloud,

so don’t force the issue.

 

· Pair students for their own Think-Aloud, giving them another editorial, “Proficient Student On-Demand Editorial – Rules.”  Have  them determine how they will take turns with their reading. Have them refer to the Think-Aloud Checklist to guide their thinking. Circulate as they work. Provide feedback and also note specific thinking strategies you hear to share with class after

they have concluded their Think-Aloud. Have the student who modeled the Think-

Aloud with you circulate taking notes also.

 

· Reflect with the class about which thinking strategies you observed. Ask a helper for

his constructive observations. Ask students to add their reactions to the Think-Aloud.

 

· Have students write in their Writer’s Notebooks about the effectiveness of these two

editorials as examples of on-demand writing. Remind them you are asking them to

“think about their thinking.”

-To what degree did the editorial influence you?

-If so, what detail, graphic, and/or technique seemed to help persuade you?

-If not, what got in the way?

 

· Review definitions of audience, purpose, form, letter, article, editorial, and speech.  Return to the Blueprints for On-Demand Writing.  Have students put the word strips on Word Wall that focus on characteristics of the genre.

 

 

ASSESSING THE LEARNING:

Observation notes from Think-Aloud pairs; student response in Writer’s Notebooks.

 

 

EXTENDING THE LEARNING:

Repeat the Think-Aloud strategy with the other samples of on-demand writing following this lesson.
THINK-ALOUD Checklist for Reading a Persuasive Text

 

 

 

 

Questions:                    Do you think...?

Why is that idea in the editorial?

 

 

Predictions:                   The picture makes me think...

I think the persuasion technique is Bandwagon.

 

 

Confirmations: You were right about...

That’s another example of loaded words....

 

 

Disconfirmations:          I sure was wrong when I said...

This editorial is for______ not _______.

 

 

Responses/ Reactions: I like that sentence; it’s really persuasive.

That technique sure wouldn’t sway me.

I never thought about that idea.

 

 

Confusions/ Need for Clarification:        I don’t know that word.

What does _______ mean?

Would you reread that sentence for me; I’m confused.

Huh?

 

 

Connections:                 I remember one time...

I did that when I tried to get...

 

 

 

 


UNIT: On-Demand Writing

 

TOPIC:  Idea Development Strategies[2]

 

LESSON 3 OBJECTIVE:  Students will learn strategies to use to develop their ideas in their writing.

 

CORE CONTENT FOR ASSESSMENT 4.1: 

Writing Content:  WR-HS- 1.2.3 - Idea Development

 

VOCABULARY:

Idea Development Strategies (see handout)

 

 

RESOURCES AND MATERIALS:

Idea Development Strategies handout (copies and transparency)

Copies of the local newspaper or a magazine

Copies of “How to Mummify a Pharaoh” Article

Highlighters

 

TEACHING STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES:

 

·  Distribute copies of the Idea Development Strategies (make sure the definitions are printed on the back of the paper).  Give students time to read over the strategies.

 

·  Writer’s Notebook

Ask students to write definitions for at least three of the strategies that they recognize.  Have students make a list of strategies that are unfamiliar to them. 

 

·  Share

Invite students to share their ideas from their Writer’s Notebooks.  Review the definitions of the strategies on the back of the handout.

 

·  Guided Practice

As a class, annotate the article, “How to Mummify a Pharaoh.”  Students should mark the text with post-its, highlighters, etc.  As a large group, scribe the discoveries on an overhead of the text.  An annotated example is included as an instructional resource.

 

·  Partner Activity

Divide students into pairs.  Give each pair a copy of the newspaper or a magazine.  Using the Idea Development handout, ask students to annotate at least one article in the newspaper or magazine by marking the strategies they see used.  Have students aim for identifying at least ten of the strategies.  Then, ask the partners to create word strips for the Word Wall with examples of the strategies they identified.  Have the partners share their word strips with the class.

ASSESSING THE LEARNING:

Assess knowledge level by giving students a “cold” reading (a text they have not seen before) and have them identify a set number of strategies used within the text. 

 

EXTENDING THE LEARNING:

Have students mark idea development strategies used in their own writing.  Use this tool as either a drafting or revision step.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


UNIT: On-Demand Writing

 

TOPIC: The Purpose of Persuasion[3]

 

LESSON 4 OBJECTIVE:  Students will identify the purpose of persuasive techniques

used in writing.

 

CORE CONTENT:

Writing Content:  WR-HS-1.1.3 – Purpose/Audience; WR-HS- 1.2.3 - Idea Development

 

VOCABULARY:

Persuasive techniques (Require students to define and place on a “Word Wall” strip for classroom display.)

 

RESOURCES AND MATERIALS:

· Several ads from popular magazines

· Manila folders containing ads using various persuasive techniques for group

activity

· Individual Student Handouts of “Persuasive Techniques” chart

· Overhead Transparency of “Persuasive Techniques”

· Reflective notebook

 

TEACHING STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES:

· Writer’s Notebook

What does it mean to persuade someone? List several methods one might employ to

persuade another. Explain how these methods might be effective in the art of persuasion?

 

· Share

Invite students to share their thinking. As they do, list key ideas and/or concepts of

persuasion students mention on the overhead or chalkboard.  Using student-generated ideas, guide students toward the following explanation of persuasive writing:

 

“Persuasion is about convincing the reader or listener to think or act in a certain way.”

 

· Mini Lesson: Emotional Appeals (Distribute copies of “Persuasive Techniques”

chart)

 

“Perhaps the first step to understanding persuasion is to recognize the role it plays in our

everyday lives. Advertisers attempt to persuade consumers each day using a variety of

techniques known as emotional appeals.”

 

1. Review chart with students.

2. One-by-one, hold up several different ads using various emotional appeals while

asking your students to state which technique(s) they think are at play in the ads.

Encourage them to refer to the chart.

· Divide the class into groups of three. Give each group a manila folder of pre-selected

ads. As the groups examine the ads, they are to identify specific examples of

persuasive techniques depicted in the ads.

 

· After adequate time, ask groups to select a reporter to share the ads and the group’s

identification of persuasive techniques used in them.

 

· Writer’s Notebook

Return to whole class. Refer students back to the purpose of persuasion. Invite

students to compose a reflection on one of the ads they looked at, using the following

prompt:

 

Explain what the ad was attempting to get the viewer to do. How effective was the

technique(s)? What was the ad’s strength or weakness?  How could you use persuasive techniques in your writing?  How would persuasive techniques strengthen an article, an editorial, a letter, or a speech?

 

ENRICHMENT: Bring in a collection of junk mail and have students determine

persuasive techniques used in each piece.

 

TECHNOLOGY CONNECTIONS:

Surf the internet to analyze electronic persuasive techniques.

 

ASSESSING THE LEARNING:

Observe groups and respond to group reports.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


UNIT: On-Demand Writing

 

TOPIC:  Prompt Analysis[4]

 

LESSON 5 OBJECTIVE:  Students will analyze on-demand writing prompts.

 

CORE CONTENT FOR ASSESSMENT 4.1: 

Writing Content:  WR-HS-1.1.3 – Purpose/Audience; WR-HS- 1.2.3 - Idea Development

 

VOCABULARY:

Prompt

Claim

Key Points

Support

Analysis/Analyze

 

RESOURCES AND MATERIALS:

Copies of Two Column Notes Chart

Copies of Sample On-Demand Prompts for PAQs (cut into strips)

Copies of Prompt Analysis Questions Handout

 

TEACHING STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES:

 

  • Writer’s Notebook

Ask students to write for a few minutes on a claim they recently heard someone make.  It could be a friend, a family member, or a teacher.  Provide an example (Student:  Teachers give too much homework.)  Ask students to write for five minutes on the claim you gave them or one they think of themselves. 

 

  • Share

Invite students to share their responses from their Writer’s Notebook.  Choose one student’s claim or the claim you gave the students to complete the Two Column Notes Chart as a whole group. 

 

  • Partner Sharing

Divide the class into pairs.  Ask students to share their Writer’s Notebook claim with their partner.  Ask the pair to choose one claim to use to complete the Two Column Notes Chart.  Tell students they must have at least three key points and at least three supporting details for each key point.  Ask the pairs to share their chart with the whole group.  Choose one claim to analyze as a whole group using the Prompt Analysis Questions.  Answer the questions as a class.  Students will have to determine on their own who the audience would be, what the purpose would be, etc.

 

 

  • Prompt Analysis

In advance of this lesson, cut the on-demand prompts that follow this lesson into strips.  Give each pair an on-demand writing prompt.  Ask the pairs to use the Prompt Analysis Questions to analyze the prompt.  Have the groups report to the whole group when finished.

 

ASSESSING THE LEARNING:

Observe partners while they work together.  Collect Prompt Analysis Questions.
UNIT: On-Demand Writing

 

TOPIC:  Flashdrafting[5]

 

LESSON 6 OBJECTIVE:  Students will be able to quickly draft their ideas onto paper in response to a prompt in order to prepare them for writing under a time limit.

 

CORE CONTENT FOR ASSESSMENT 4.1: 

Writing Content:  WR-HS-1.1.3 – Purpose/Audience; WR-HS- 1.2.3 - Idea Development

Writing Structure: WR-HS-2.3.3 – Organization; WR-HS-2.4.3 – Sentence Structure

Writing Conventions: WR-HS-3.5.0 – Language; WR-HS- 3.6.0 – Correctness

 

VOCABULARY:

Flashdrafting

 

RESOURCES AND MATERIALS:

Copy of On-Demand Writing Prompt (Select one from samples included in the Appendix of this unit.)

 

TEACHING STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES:

 

The teacher should model each step of this activity with his/her own writing.

 

·  Have students draft for ten minutes on the prompt.

·  Have students then highlight the phrases most promising to them.

·  Have students list the points they made, then rearrange in coherent order.

·  Have students reread their list; compose one sentence to describe their main point (thesis statement).

·  Draft again for ten minutes.

·  Read the second draft to a partner, then have him/her name the main idea heard while listening.

 

 

ASSESSING THE LEARNING:

Observe partner sharing; collect flashdrafting.


UNIT: On-Demand Writing

 

TOPIC:  Using a Graphic Organizer

 

LESSON 7 OBJECTIVE:  Students will learn to use a graphic organizer to develop their ideas for writing in response to an on-demand prompt.

 

CORE CONTENT FOR ASSESSMENT 4.1: 

Writing Content:  WR-HS-1.1.3 – Purpose/Audience; WR-HS- 1.2.3 - Idea Development

Writing Structure: WR-HS-2.3.3 – Organization; WR-HS-2.4.3 – Sentence Structure

Writing Conventions: WR-HS-3.5.0 – Language; WR-HS- 3.6.0 – Correctness

 

VOCABULARY:

Graphic Organizers

 

RESOURCES AND MATERIALS:

Copies and Transparency of the Graphic Organizers

Copies of an On-Demand Writing Prompt (Use the one from the previous lesson on flashdrafting.)

 

TEACHING STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES:

 

·  Distribute copies of the on-demand writing prompt.  Read the prompt aloud as a group.  Brainstorm ideas with the class on the prompt.  Students can use their flashdrafting from the previous lesson for ideas for discussion.

 

·  Writer’s Notebook

Ask students to make list of the best ideas from their flashdrafting.  Have students record their thesis statement (main idea) in their notebook. 

 

·  Distribute copies of graphic organizers included with this lesson.  You might want to choose one type of organizer to use with your class or you may want to offer a variety of organizers once the students have spent time mastering each one.  Ask students to complete their graphic organizer based on their flashdrafting and writer’s notebook.

 

·  Model your own graphic organizer based on your flashdrafting.  Ask students to share their organizers with the class.

 

 

ASSESSING THE LEARNING:

Distribute an on-demand writing prompt that students have not yet seen.  You should select a different form this time.  Discuss the prompt as a whole group.  Ask students to flashdraft for ten minutes and complete a graphic organizer.  Collect this work.  Be prepared to distribute it for the next lesson.
 UNIT:  On-Demand Writing

 

TOPIC:  Responding to a Prompt

 

LESSON 8 OBJECTIVE:  Students will respond successfully to an on-demand writing prompt.

 

CORE CONTENT FOR ASSESSMENT 4.1: 

Writing Content:  WR-HS-1.1.3 – Purpose/Audience; WR-HS- 1.2.3 - Idea Development

Writing Structure: WR-HS-2.3.3 – Organization; WR-HS-2.4.3 – Sentence Structure

Writing Conventions: WR-HS-3.5.0 – Language; WR-HS- 3.6.0 – Correctness

 

VOCABULARY:

Review Word Wall Vocabulary from unit.

 

RESOURCES AND MATERIALS:

Copies of the On-Demand Writing prompt from the Released Items from the Appendix of this unit (Use the editorial or speech.)

Dictionaries/Thesauri

 

TEACHING STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES:

 

Prewriting

  • Distribute the On-Demand Writing prompt.  Discuss/debate the prompt as a class.  Remind students of the techniques they have learned in this unit:  idea development strategies, persuasive techniques, analyzing a prompt, flashdrafting, graphic organizers, etc.

 

  • Ask students to refer to the Blueprint for the form of the writing prompt.  Allow students time to flashdraft and complete a graphic organizer.

 

Drafting

  • Students spend class time prewriting and begin drafting.  Allow students to use dictionaries and thesauri as they may use these on the assessment.  The teacher should circulate during this time to answer questions and provide feedback on progress.

 

  • The teacher may choose to have students continue working on the draft at home or during the next class session depending on the schedule.

 

ASSESSING THE LEARNING:

Collect students’ prewriting to provide feedback on their progress.
UNIT:  On-Demand Writing

 

TOPIC:  Revision Techniques

 

LESSON 9 OBJECTIVE:  Students will revise their own draft to meet the requirements of the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric.

 

CORE CONTENT FOR ASSESSMENT 4.1:

Writing Content:  WR-HS-1.1.3 – Purpose/Audience; WR-HS- 1.2.3 - Idea Development

Writing Structure: WR-HS-2.3.3 – Organization; WR-HS-2.4.3 – Sentence Structure

Writing Conventions: WR-HS-3.5.0 – Language; WR-HS- 3.6.0 – Correctness

 

VOCABULARY:

Review Word Wall for this unit.

 

RESOURCES AND MATERIALS:

Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric

Idea Development Handout

Persuasive Techniques Chart

Blueprints for On-Demand Writing

 

TEACHING STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES:

 

  • Once the students have completed their drafts, model the process of revising a draft using a draft you have written or a student response from the annotated released items (choose an apprentice or novice student response).  The first step of this process is reading the draft aloud.  Have students listen and record their questions and thoughts as you read.

 

Refer students to the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric for ideas for revision.  Walk students through revising the draft on the overhead.  You may want to teach each of these mini-lessons in isolation as you work with one on-demand piece or as your students respond to multiple on-demand writing prompts.  For example, work on idea development as your students respond to a prompt that asks them to write an editorial; persuasive techniques as they write a speech; characteristics of the genre as they write an article; conventions as they write a letter.

 

  • Mini-Lesson on revising for stronger idea development:  Begin with a focus on developing ideas using the strategies from the lesson on idea development.  Refer to the handout on idea development.  Remind students of the mummy article that they annotated in the earlier lesson.  Ask students to read their draft and identify idea development strategies that they used.  Students should spend time working to incorporate as many idea development strategies as appropriate to their writing.

 

  • Mini-Lesson on revising for convincing arguments:  Have students revisit the chart on persuasive techniques.  Ask students where the writer could have included more persuasion in the piece.  Again, refer students back to their own draft to identify persuasive techniques they used.  Students should spend time working to incorporate as many persuasive techniques as appropriate to their writing.

 

  • Mini-Lesson on characteristics of the genre:  Refer students to the Blueprint for the form of the writing.  Ask students to identify characteristics in the model and in their own draft.

 

  • Mini-Lesson on transitions:  Use the handout in the appendix on transitions to help your students organize their writing.  Model the process using the annotated student response from the released items.  Share an example of a piece of writing that uses strong transitions.

 

  • Mini-Lesson on conventions:  Work as a whole-group to identify the errors in grammar and correctness evident in the annotated released item (use the novice papers as examples).  Then, ask students to visit their own drafts to work on conventions.  Emphasize the importance of using the dictionary to check for correctness and the thesaurus to strengthen word choice.

 

  • Teachers may want students to finish revising and complete their final draft for homework or continue working on the writing in class. 

 

ASSESSING THE LEARNING:

Collect student’s drafts with revision and editing marks.


UNIT: On-Demand Writing

 

TOPIC:  Peer- and Self-Assessment Strategies

 

LESSON 10 OBJECTIVE:  Students will assess their own writing and the writing of one of their peers.

 

CORE CONTENT FOR ASSESSMENT 4.1: 

Writing Content:  WR-HS-1.1.3 – Purpose/Audience; WR-HS- 1.2.3 - Idea Development

Writing Structure: WR-HS-2.3.3 – Organization; WR-HS-2.4.3 – Sentence Structure

Writing Conventions: WR-HS-3.5.0 – Language; WR-HS- 3.6.0 – Correctness

 

RESOURCES AND MATERIALS:

Copies of the Two Column Chart

Copies of Revision Checklist for On-Demand Writing

Copies of Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric

Copies of On-Demand Self-Tracking Handout

 

TEACHING STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES:

 

  • Mini-Lesson: Paired Reading – Peer Assessment

Divide students into pairs.  Each student will read his/her draft aloud to another student.  The student who is listening will complete a Two Column Chart based on what they hear as they listen to the other student read his/her draft.  Once both partners have read their drafts, students should exchange charts.  The student can check to chart to see that she or he communicated what they meant in their writing.  This would be a good time to allow for additional revisions.  Students will want to make changes as they read aloud as well as after they see and discuss the chart with their partners.

 

  • Mini-Lesson: Revision Checklist – Self Assessment

Distribute copies of the Revision Checklist for On-Demand Writing.  Students read the questions and answer them in their Writer’s Notebooks.  Do not allow yes or no answers.  Students should explore their drafts through their Writer’s Notebooks.  Allow students to continue to revise at this point.

 

  • Mini-Lesson: Scoring Rubric & On-Demand Self-Tracking

Distribute copies of the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric.  Ask students to read their final draft and score it based on the Rubric.  Students complete the On-Demand Self-Tracking handout after completing an On-Demand Writing activity.  Keep this as an assessment tool for students.

 

ASSESSING THE LEARNING:

Collect Two Column Charts from Paired Reading and provide feedback.

Collect revised, final draft and provide feedback based on the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric.


APPENDIX

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

On-Demand Writing Prompt Template

 

Guidelines to Create an On-Demand Writing Prompt

 

Cautions to the Writer of an On-Demand Prompt

 

Tips for Successful On-Demand Writing

 

Connecting and Concluding Transitions

 

On-Demand Writing Prompts

 

Annotated CATS Released Items – Grade 12

 

 

 

 

 



[1] Adapted from the Jefferson County Core Content Guide, High School Persuasive Reading and Writing

[2] Lesson adapted from Missy Callaway, Louisville Writing Project

[3] Adapted from the Jefferson County Public Schools’ Core Content Guide, High School Persuasive Reading and Writing

 

 

[4] Lesson adapted from a lesson by Missy Callaway, Louisville Writing Project and Writing On Demand by Anne Ruggles Gere, Leila Christenbury, Kelly Sassi.

[5] Adapted from Missy Callaway, Louisville Writing Project